Convincing; Preparation Pt.3

If you’ve done your research, you know every cat needs a ‘safe room’ in the first few days/weeks (depends on the character of the cat) after the adoption. A safe room is a room or closed off space in your house that’s not too busy, and not in the middle of all social interaction. A spare (bed)room would be perfect, but your own bedroom can also be used, as long as you keep it relatively quiet. The safe room needs to be kitty proof, and should contain the cat’s necessities.

In our house, it’d be the front part of the attic, right in front of my bedroom. As we have a spiral staircase in the front-attic, we’ll have to block that off, but after that’d, it’d be perfectly safe for a kitten, and very accessible for me should I need to check in during the night. The front-attic will be the cat’s homebase, we’ll have a cat tower, beds, the litterbox etc. there. Later, the cat will have free roam of the house as long as we’re home. All we have to do at home is hide the cords, find a place for the second litterbox, and block up the roof storage.

Make sure your house is cat proofed! Hide cords, small, loose objects, things that you’d also hide from a toddler. I found some tips on Pinterest (they’re somewhere on the board). I also pinned a lot of ‘catification’ tips and tricks, or just examples. What is catification? Simply put, its decorating your house, for your cat. You put up shelves, as getting the cat up high makes him/her more confident, and a confident kitty is often a well-behaved kitty. You give the cat hidey holes for when they want to get away for a while, and make sure everything is safe. If you want to know more about catification, Jackson Galaxy wrote a book about it, but you can also find plenty of youtube videos on it!

I’m planning on designing a cat wall for Fin, so I might post pictures of that when the design is finished, or, when we’ve made it. (Wishful thinkiiiing!)

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